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Funeral music of queen Mary- Direction

Funeral music of queen Mary- Direction

(Code: A121900608)

Come and sing this superb work by Purcell (1659 - 1695), sung at the funeral of Queen Mary and revisited by Roger Calmel. Work for 4-part mixed choir and basso continuo plus March and Canzone for brass quartet (2 trumpets and 2 trombones or 1 trumpet and 3 trombones) and timpani.

7.50 EUR
112g
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Come and sing this superb work by Purcell (1659 - 1695), sung at the funeral of Queen Mary and revisited by Roger Calmel:



Work for choir with 4 mixed voices and basso continuo + March and Canzone for brass quartet (2 trumpets and 2 trombones or 1 trumpet and 3 trombones) + timpani.

Sources and some indications:



The Funeral Sentences - according to the Common Prayer of 1660 and the Book of Job, chapter 14, verses 1 and 2 - include three anthems for choir and continuo. The main sources are the manuscripts of the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, MS 88 and 117.
The first collection of complete anthems by various composers is in Purcell's hand (Purcell excelled in musical copying, which enabled him to obtain some subsidies for living).
It contains Man that is born of a woman and In the midst of life; after this second sentence, Purcell left two blank pages as if he had wanted to complete his work afterwards.
The two indexes of this manuscript are dated September 13, 1677 and September 10, 1682.
The second manuscript (MS 117) is in the hand of John Blow - to whom Purcell succeeded the organs of Westminster Abbey in 1679 - and is dated 1683. It contains the first version of Thou knowest Lord on an extra page inserted between pages 349 and 350.
For the funeral of Queen Mary in 1695, Purcell wrote a new version of the third sentence, much simpler, in harmonic style, completed with a March and a Canzona for trumpets, trombones and timpani.
The March is based on music that Purcell composed for Shadwell's The Libertine in 1682.
The only source for the March and Canzona is found in Ms. V.a. 37, Oriel College, Oxford with these indications: "The Queen's Funeral March sounded before her chariot" and "Canzona, As it was sounded in the Abbey after the Anthem".
The second version of Thou knowest Lord can be found in the manuscript Add MS 31444 at the British Museum in London.
A final source is a manuscript attributed to John Blow: Ass MS 17839.
These sentences were certainly carried out several times in the 17th century, which is attested by the numerous copies that have come down to us.
The first part, Man that is born of a woman, was probably already executed for the funeral of Matthew Locke (Purcell's teacher and very good friend) in August 1677 when he was buried at Chapel Royal of the Savoy.
This present edition proposes, in the first sentence - Man that is born... - the A flat at bar 7, followed by the A natural at bar 8, for the sopranos. This is the most widespread use since John Blow advocated it in his 1683 manuscript (MS 117).
She also proposes, for the first version of the third part - Thou knowest Lord - bars 3/4 instead of 3/2, from bar 22 to bar 40.

Content :
  • Marche
  • Man that is born of a woman
  • Canzone
  • In the midst of life
  • Thou knowest lord (1ère version)
  • Thou knowest lord (2éme version)