Err

French specialists in choral singing!
Trois fables de monsieur de La Fontaine en forme d'étude

Trois fables de monsieur de La Fontaine en forme d'étude

(Code: A110410013)
Benoît Menut was born in Brest, in 1977, surrounded by a family composed of musicians. He studied music at Conservatoire de Brest and met Pierick Houdy, and then he wrote his first works. After that, he studied in CNR and CNSM, Paris, and then he worked with Olivier Greif from 1998 to 2000. There are many choral pieces in his catalog. They were written for Les Cris de Paris, the Ensemble Benjamin Britten, the Viva Lux trio, and the Choeur National des Jeunes ACJ. However, there are also chamber music works written for Callioppée, Carré Mêlé, and Trombamania for example, and an opera for children which extracts were given to the Cité de la Musique. He is a fully qualified teacher, and he teaches music at Conservatories of 12th and 17th arrondissements of Paris. He wrote a textbook for ear training entitled “La dictée en musique.” which was published by Éditions Lemoine and he wrote a biography of Guy Ropartz in association with Mathieu Ferey published by Éditions Papillon. Website: www.benoitmenut.com

(Translated from French)


Benoît Menut wrote those words for “These works were a request of Valérie Fayet and were written in June, 2006 for the Choeur National des Jeunes ACJ. I chose three little known fables which deal with vanity, stupidity and human violence. Jean de La Fontaine’s writing is always strong, fine and funny. As each fable is based on a precise thing, I chose subtitles to explain them. That’s why I precised “Parole de Socrate” was dealing with monodic research and intertextuality, I precised “L’Oiseau blessé d’une fleche” was dealing with fundamentals and colors, and I precised that “Le Singe” was dealing with rhythmic and modal analysis. Those pieces can be performed separately, but they are gathered in a particular rhythmic order, which is: moderate, slow, and quick. This is similar to the way choir cycles worked at the beginning of the 20th century (Ravel, Debussy, and others). I think that if the fables are recited before being musically performed by an actor or a chorister, it enables the public to see the entire work from a more ‘poetic’ angle.”
7.75 EUR
g
Discount on quantity
From20
Discount10.00%


Le singe (Benoit Menut)
L'oiseau blessé d'une flèche (Benoit Menut/ Jean De La Fontaine)
Parole de Socrate (Benoit Menut/ Jean De La Fontaine)

Benoît Menut was born in Brest, in 1977, surrounded by a family composed of musicians. He studied music at Conservatoire de Brest and met Pierick Houdy, and then he wrote his first works. After that, he studied in CNR and CNSM, Paris, and then he worked with Olivier Greif from 1998 to 2000. There are many choral pieces in his catalog. They were written for Les Cris de Paris, the Ensemble Benjamin Britten, the Viva Lux trio, and the Choeur National des Jeunes ACJ. However, there are also chamber music works written for Callioppée, Carré Mêlé, and Trombamania for example, and an opera for children which extracts were given to the Cité de la Musique. He is a fully qualified teacher, and he teaches music at Conservatories of 12th and 17th arrondissements of Paris. He wrote a textbook for ear training entitled “La dictée en musique.” which was published by Éditions Lemoine and he wrote a biography of Guy Ropartz in association with Mathieu Ferey published by Éditions Papillon. Website: www.benoitmenut.com

(Translated from French)


Benoît Menut wrote those words for “These works were a request of Valérie Fayet and were written in June, 2006 for the Choeur National des Jeunes ACJ. I chose three little known fables which deal with vanity, stupidity and human violence. Jean de La Fontaine’s writing is always strong, fine and funny. As each fable is based on a precise thing, I chose subtitles to explain them. That’s why I precised “Parole de Socrate” was dealing with monodic research and intertextuality, I precised “L’Oiseau blessé d’une fleche” was dealing with fundamentals and colors, and I precised that “Le Singe” was dealing with rhythmic and modal analysis. Those pieces can be performed separately, but they are gathered in a particular rhythmic order, which is: moderate, slow, and quick. This is similar to the way choir cycles worked at the beginning of the 20th century (Ravel, Debussy, and others). I think that if the fables are recited before being musically performed by an actor or a chorister, it enables the public to see the entire work from a more ‘poetic’ angle.”