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Mozart de retour à Lyon

Mozart de retour à Lyon

(Code: A121900661)

“Mozart à Lyon” is a perfect way to celebrate Lyon and its gastronomy. The first movement need no effort and represents the state of anybody who would have enjoyed the meal without a complete abandon. Lyrics of the first minuet highlight the contrast between Mozart’s childhood, his father placing him under the spotlights and his adulthood without the need of his father. The second minuet reminds us of “Eine kleine Nachtmusik” which was also composed of two minuets. This was proved by a sheet music found in 1943 of which he tore off sheets himself. The third movement is based on the melody of “The Marriage of Figaro:” “Non più andrai.” It was firstly a four-four time melody but it was transformed into a minuet and so it became three four time. This can be seen as a joke from the composer but Mozart did quote it into “Don Giovanni” at the same time as he was writing “Eine kleine Nachtmusik.” Moreover, he composed “A Musical Joke” the same year. Would Mozart have wanted to censor himself by destroying his minuet, considering his creation not serious enough? The last movement written in the same atmosphere than Mozart’s version is an invitation to sing, to dance and to love.

14.40 EUR
174g
Discount on quantity
From20
Discount10.00%


1- Bourré(e) lent(e) (Roger Miller) - 4'20''
2- Menuet 1 (Roger Miller) - 2'10''
3- Menuet 2 (Roger Miller) - 1'10''
4- Rondo (Roger Miller) - 5'00''


“Mozart à Lyon” is a perfect way to celebrate Lyon and its gastronomy. The first movement need no effort and represents the state of anybody who would have enjoyed the meal without a complete abandon. Lyrics of the first minuet highlight the contrast between Mozart’s childhood, his father placing him under the spotlights and his adulthood without the need of his father. The second minuet reminds us of “Eine kleine Nachtmusik” which was also composed of two minuets. This was proved by a sheet music found in 1943 of which he tore off sheets himself. The third movement is based on the melody of “The Marriage of Figaro:” “Non più andrai.” It was firstly a four-four time melody but it was transformed into a minuet and so it became three four time. This can be seen as a joke from the composer but Mozart did quote it into “Don Giovanni” at the same time as he was writing “Eine kleine Nachtmusik.” Moreover, he composed “A Musical Joke” the same year. Would Mozart have wanted to censor himself by destroying his minuet, considering his creation not serious enough? The last movement written in the same atmosphere than Mozart’s version is an invitation to sing, to dance and to love.

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