Err

French specialists in choral singing!
Un tableau dans l'oreille

Un tableau dans l'oreille

(Code: A121900703)

Those are unaccompanied vocal music short pieces intended for middle school students. It’s based on nine paintings exhibited in the Musée d’arts de Nantes’s renovated galleries.
The aim is to draw closer to famous painters but also to develop a choir melody from those prestigious paintings, based on some well-known movements such as popular music, minimalist music, passacaglia, vocal play, musical design and even a little bit of improvisation.
Those opuses have exclusively been written for unaccompanied vocal music, so young singers can experiment the pleasure of shaping and precising their own choir music at the same time as discovering harmony’s benefits. This would not go without some cheekiness.
However, if the choir isn’t sure, if desks are losing their balance, if voices aren’t so in tune, then some instruments should be included but be careful to their range and various stylistic accounts you get.
So, it can be suggested that: bowed stringed instruments better suit to “Le Vielleur”, some sonorous brass better suit for “Charlotte Corday”, low octaves (as D-A in stubborn cadenza) slowly played on a piano better suit for “Naufrage du trois-mâts ‘L’Emily’”, three contrary collection instruments can be played for each line of “Les cribleuses de blé”, then playing bass can represent the punctuate rhythm and alto’s bourdon in “Diane”, why not, and finally a little bit of fairground organ may be played on “Les grandes plages de Biarritz” just like a wink.
Some percussionist can come and improvise on repetitive cells in “Soto”, and then all instrumentalists of each category can mix to amplify graphics, a tribute to Kandinsky.
The choirmaster is free to choose the order of pictures. However, stylistic changes have to be taken into consideration.

16.50 EUR
252g
Discount on quantity
From20
Discount10.00%

I. Georges de La Tour (1593-1652) / Le Vielleur (1620-1625) choeur à 3 voix égales
II. Vassily Kandinsky (1866-1944) / Milder Vorgang (1928) jeux vocaux graphiques
III. Paul Baudry (1828-1886) / Charlotte Corday (1860) choeur à 2 voix égales et récitant
IV. Jesus Rafael Soto (1923-2005) / sans titre (1971) jeux vocaux parlando ritmico
V. Eugène Isabey (1803-1866) / Naufrage du trois-mâts « l’Emily » (1823) Leon-François Comerre (1850-1916) / Le déluge (1911) choeur à 3 voix égales
VI. Gustave Courbet (1819-1877) / Les cribleuses de blé (1854) choeur à 3 voix égales
VII. Orazio Lomi Gentileschi (1563-1639) / Diane chasseresse choeur à 3 voix égales
VIII. Jean Hélion (1904-1987) / Nature morte à la citrouille (1948) jeux vocaux parlando ritmico
IX. Jacqueline Marval (1866-1932) / La grande plage de Biarritz (1923) choeur à 3 voix égales

Those are unaccompanied vocal music short pieces intended for middle school students. It’s based on nine paintings exhibited in the Musée d’arts de Nantes’s renovated galleries.
The aim is to draw closer to famous painters but also to develop a choir melody from those prestigious paintings, based on some well-known movements such as popular music, minimalist music, passacaglia, vocal play, musical design and even a little bit of improvisation.
Those opuses have exclusively been written for unaccompanied vocal music, so young singers can experiment the pleasure of shaping and precising their own choir music at the same time as discovering harmony’s benefits. This would not go without some cheekiness.
However, if the choir isn’t sure, if desks are losing their balance, if voices aren’t so in tune, then some instruments should be included but be careful to their range and various stylistic accounts you get.
So, it can be suggested that: bowed stringed instruments better suit to “Le Vielleur”, some sonorous brass better suit for “Charlotte Corday”, low octaves (as D-A in stubborn cadenza) slowly played on a piano better suit for “Naufrage du trois-mâts ‘L’Emily’”, three contrary collection instruments can be played for each line of “Les cribleuses de blé”, then playing bass can represent the punctuate rhythm and alto’s bourdon in “Diane”, why not, and finally a little bit of fairground organ may be played on “Les grandes plages de Biarritz” just like a wink.
Some percussionist can come and improvise on repetitive cells in “Soto”, and then all instrumentalists of each category can mix to amplify graphics, a tribute to Kandinsky.
The choirmaster is free to choose the order of pictures. However, stylistic changes have to be taken into consideration.