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Salve Regina

Salve Regina

(Code: A112800004)

On his road to success, Patrick Rutgé became a singer for the Ensemble Vocal de Lausanne, supervised by Michel Corboz, and they approached the great choral repertoire. He studied electroacoustics in Strasbourg with François Bernard Mâche, and it widened his musical interests as well as sealing his fate of becoming a composer. Choral conducting is his third activity (big mixed choir, children's choirs, and octet). His musical practicing is diversified by these different interests. He created very different works like “Passion selon saint Marc” for choirs, soloists and magnetic tapes, the 10-scened railroad melodrama “Erwartung Time” for the singing class in Sallanches and “Trois prières à la Vierge.” “Salve Regina” is a part of the trilogy “Trois prières à la Vierge” with “Ave Maria” and “Ave Maris Stella.” It’s the only one to be for equal female voices, the two other parts are for standard mixed choirs. The melody is based on “Salve,” but there are some free harmonic digressions.

3.25 EUR
12g
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On his road to success, Patrick Rutgé became a singer for the Ensemble Vocal de Lausanne, supervised by Michel Corboz, and they approached the great choral repertoire. He studied electroacoustics in Strasbourg with François Bernard Mâche, and it widened his musical interests as well as sealing his fate of becoming a composer. Choral conducting is his third activity (big mixed choir, children's choirs, and octet). His musical practicing is diversified by these different interests. He created very different works like “Passion selon saint Marc” for choirs, soloists and magnetic tapes, the 10-scened railroad melodrama “Erwartung Time” for the singing class in Sallanches and “Trois prières à la Vierge.” “Salve Regina” is a part of the trilogy “Trois prières à la Vierge” with “Ave Maria” and “Ave Maris Stella.” It’s the only one to be for equal female voices, the two other parts are for standard mixed choirs. The melody is based on “Salve,” but there are some free harmonic digressions.